Drag King Richard III

The final show at the famous Riverside Studios in Hammersmith in August 2014, Drag King Richard III is a queer story of transitioning in the 90s in the Deep South of America. Terri Power employs Shakespeare to explore Laurence's dark thoughts, black humour and childhood memories as well as his evolving relationship with La Femme as he transitions from female to male.

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 "As Lawrence, Zander has eyes that pierce and the ability to register an overwhelming numbers of emotions at once. As she watches LaFemme get in to her femme drag for the night, she brings a sort of stunned and exquisite sting to an unrelenting play of nostalgia, shock, and desire."

— Exuent Magazine

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"Well worth seeing with very strong performances from the two leads."

— The Gay UK

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"...  Zander is strangely hypnotic... Lawrence is a complicated character to take on, but Zander embraces the part wholeheartedly, successfully conveying his anguish and simple desire to be accepted."

— views from the gods

"The cast… were electric. Anne Zander performed Laurie/Laurence with a convincing masculinity they also conveyed genuine fragility. She also handled some more abstract scenes well, especially when it involved interacting with the audience."

— London Theatre 1

"Zander is excellent casting for this role - her features are like a rack of razor blades, her blue eyes wide and confrontational, her body like a high tension cable.  As she stalks the stage she makes eye contact with the audience - when she's locked on to you, you become a deer on a road at night transfixed by the car bearing down upon it.

Her command of Shakespeare is also deeply impressive, imbuing dialogue… with spiky fervour, leaving us no doubts as to its relevance to the transgender experience."

— London City Nights

"This play would make demands on its actors in any circumstances, but veers close to the impossible with just the three days rehearsal... Had we not been told that in a pre-show announcement, we would never have known, so strong are the performances.  Zander channels Berlin period Bowie, the Thin White Duke suits and self-loathing evident in her scowls, her aggression and her insecurity."

— Broadway World

All photos on this page courtesy of Jamie Scott-Smith.